Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food

Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food

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Product Description

The Complete Guide To Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food

What Is Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food?

If your cat is suffering from urinary discomfort and has a tendency to develop bladder stones, Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food might just be the diet you need to prevent that. Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food is designed to dissolve these stones and support your cat's urinary health.

Can Cats Have Bladder Stones?

Both cats and dogs can get bladder stones. These bladder stones in cats are called uroliths or cystic calculi. These stones are composed of minerals that crystallize in your cat's urinary system and bladder. These can occur as a single massive stone or multiple smaller stones, or a combination of both.

Bladder stones in cats are caused by some sort of inflammation of the bladder or because of some infection. If you see any blood in your cat's urine or if you see your cat is struggling to urinate, then you should speak to your vet about checking for bladder stones.

You might notice that your cat has become lethargic or show other signs of discomfort. Cats often urinate outside their litter box when they are sick, and you should keep an eye out for this behavior. Male cats are more prone to developing bladder stones, though this condition occurs in both male and female cats.

What Causes Bladder Stones in Cats?

Bladder stones are caused by crystals in your cat's urine that solidify into a stone over time. The minerals these crystals are made of are present in your cat's body naturally. However, when the concentration of these minerals increases, they begin to crystalize. The edges of the crystals are sharp and cut into your cat's bladder, making it produce mucus.

The mucus then binds the crystals into stones. This process occurs because of an increase in urinary pH, if the protein isn't processed correctly by your cat's body and ends up in the urine, and if your cat isn't having enough water and their urine becomes concentrated. This process can happen in as fast as a few weeks!

How Does Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food Help?

Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food is a prescription medical diet that is specifically made to alleviate the cause of bladder stones. Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food prevents minerals from crystalizing, preventing struvite stones.

Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food adjusts the pH level of your cat's urine and makes it unfavorable for stone formation. Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food is made with low levels of phosphorus and magnesium, minerals that support stone formation but are essential to your cat's nutritional needs.

Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food contains all the vitamins, minerals, and nutrients your cat needs to support their immune system during this stressful time. The precise combinations of ingredients in Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food ensure your cat goes on to live a happy, healthy life!

How Much Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food Should I Feed Daily?

The amount of Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food your cat needs depends on their weight. You can use the following guidelines:

Cat's Weight Daily Amount (g)
6 lbs 40g
8 lbs 45g
10 lbs 60g
12 lbs 75g
14 lbs 80g
16 lbs 90g
18 lbs 100g

Divide the recommended daily amount of food by the number of meals you give your cat every day to determine how much you need to give at each meal. Make sure you're not giving the total daily amount for each meal; otherwise, you risk overfeeding your cat. This can lead to obesity, which negatively affects every aspect of your cat's life.

Additionally, when you start to give your cat Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food, make sure you are transitioning the new diet in just seven days. Animals can react adversely to new foods, and introducing it mixed in with their new food will increase palatability and lower chances of rejection.

Are There Any Precautions or Side Effects of Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food?

There are no adverse side effects of Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food. However, eating this can increase your cat's urine output and, subsequently, increase their thirst. Make sure your cat has access to a clean bowl of water at all times when feeding Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food.

Additionally, if you have multiple cats at home, make sure only the cat with bladder stones gets to eat Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food. Since this is a medical diet, it can mess up your other cats' healthy systems and have unknown adverse reactions.

Frequently Asked Questions
  1. Can I Give Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food to My Dog?

    Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food should not be given to dogs. Your dog's body chemistry is very different, and you can risk your dog becoming ill. If your dog is suffering from bladder stones, buy Hill's Prescription Diet Urinary Care Dry Dog Food instead.

  2. Does Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food Need a Prescription?

    Yes, Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food needs to be prescribed by a vet. This is because the food is made to solve a specific medical problem, and your cat might not need to continue having it after the problem is solved.

  3. Is This Food Grain or Gluten-Free?

    Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food contains corn gluten meal and brewer's rice. If your dog is allergic to any of these, you should let your vet know about these allergies before starting your cat on this diet.

  4. Is This Safe for Kittens?

    Hill's Prescription Diet s/d Urinary Care Dry Cat Food is usually prescribed for adult cats. If you suspect your kitten has bladder stones, you should consult your vet for confirmation and advice on what food would best suit your kitten.

Ingredients

Brewers Rice, Chicken By-Product Meal, Pork Fat, Corn Gluten Meal, Dried Egg Product, Calcium Sulfate, Lactic Acid, Chicken Liver Flavor, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, DL-Methionine, Iodized Salt, vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin D3 Supplement), Taurine, minerals (Ferrous Sulfate, Zinc Oxide, Copper Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Iodate, Sodium Selenite), Mixed Tocopherols for freshness, Beta-Carotene, Natural Flavors.

Directions

Adjust feeding amounts as necessary to maintain optimal weight. If you are unsure, ask your veterinarian. For best results & safety practices: Gradually transition to your pets new food over a 7 day period. Exclusively feed the recommended Prescription Diet dry food & canned food. Keep fresh water available at all times. Have your veterinarian monitor your pets condition.

Transition Instructions

A gradual transition to a new pet food is important to avoid digestive upset. To transition, mix your pet's current food with the new food. Over 7 days, gradually decrease the amount of the current pet food while increasing the amount of new pet food. In some cases, your veterinarian may recommend no transition or a shorter transition time.

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